Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Commerce’s IT modernization is all about shared services

Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker challenged her senior technology managers to be more collaborative and coordinated in modernizing the agency’s technology infrastructure.

The result of that challenge is a four-pronged approach to the sharing of IT resources.

Steve Cooper, the Commerce Department’s chief information officer, said four working groups are examining the opportunities across technology, finance, human resources and acquisition.

“We are moving toward achieving true shared services in the sense that whatever services are identified by each of those work streams we will then, most likely — and we haven’t done this yet but this is where we are heading — by the end of quarter two or the beginning of quarter three of this fiscal year so we are making very good progress…the idea will be for those services that we agree are viable and could be delivered through a shared services set of providers,” Cooper said. “We’ll likely create an organization inside the Department of Commerce that then would be tasked with the responsibility to select those providers in each of the four functional areas, manage, put service level agreements in place, put appropriate metrics in place and ensure the successful quality delivery of those shared services.”

Cooper said the bureau level CIOs are very supportive of this effort, which, in some ways, pleasantly surprised him.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Anthem breach prompts White House adviser to nudge Congress

The massive cyber attack on Anthem has prompted top White House advisers to encourage Congress to fast-track legislation to bolster the protection of consumer data.

This latest breach, which exposed the sensitive information of 80 million of the managed health services company’s current and former customers and employees, makes the case for “a single national standard to protect consumers from data breaches,” John Podesta, counselor to President Obama, told reporters in a Thursday conference call, according to a Bloomberg report.

Congress is mulling several breach and data protection initiatives, with the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade holding hearings on what future legislation might look like. Obama has been quite vocal in calling for a national data breach notification law during his State of the Union address as well as a student data privacy act.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Wearables will fuel a massive surge in mobile data by 2019

The rapidly growing popularity of wearable devices will lead to a surge in volume of mobile traffic, Cisco is predicting.

Cisco forecasts that 578 million wearable devices will be in use around the globe by 2019, up from 109 million last year. That’s a fivefold increase, but the resulting mobile data traffic will increase by a factor of 18 — though most of that traffic will be channeled through smartphones, the networking giant claimed Tuesday in its annual look ahead at traffic trends.

Some wearables, like the upcoming Apple Watch, require using a smartphone to transmit data. But the devices on average already generate six times more traffic per month than a basic handset, Cisco said. Its high-end example of a wearable is a GoPro video cameras, which can generate about 5 MB of mobile data traffic per minute when live streaming.

Overall, there will be 11.5 billion mobile connections by 2019. Of those, 8.3 billion will come from personal mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, which Cisco claimed will see a resurgence as they take on more features found in tablets.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Drones and cybersecurity Part 2: Solutions

Drones and cybersecurity part 1: The challenges we face and cybersecurity’s role,” we’ve heard of more incidents of drones flying around and near airports, discussions about the exploding use of drones for official, commercial, and private use, …and a private drone crashing on the White House lawn. Safe to say the sense of urgency has ratcheted up quite a bit.

Conventional methods to detect and mitigate threats from drones are limited; radars either don’t detect drones or characterize them incorrectly (i.e. migratory birds). Additionally, if radar does detect the drone, it cannot mitigate the threat or identify the source. Clearly a comprehensive solution that finds and IDs the drone platform, mitigates the threat safely, and provides forensic evidence to government and law enforcement officials is necessary whether you’re protecting the Super Bowl, an airport, or a government facility.

As I mentioned last time, drones have onboard logic and communications channels, therefore the use of advanced cybersecurity platform protection techniques can be employed. Defense contractors and technology companies alike are developing cybersecurity solutions to address the aforementioned challenges. One approach that has been developed creates a “cyber fence” that employs the use of cyber defense techniques found on traditional IT networks, except it uses those techniques against platforms such as drones. This cyber fence can be integrated into other physical, electronic, and cyber defense mechanisms to offer full protection against this threat.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Cyber-attacks rising in Utah, likely due to NSA facility

Utah state officials have seen what they describe as a sharp uptick in attempts to hack into state computers in the last two years, and they think it related to the NSA data center south of Salt Lake City.

The increase began in early 2013 as international attention focused on the NSA’s $1.7 billion warehouse to store massive amounts of information gathered secretly from phone calls and emails.

“In the cyber world, that’s a big deal,” Utah Public Safety Commissioner Keith Squires told a state legislative committee this week.

While most of the attempts are likely innocuous, cyber experts say it is possible low-level hackers, “hactivists” unhappy with the NSA’s tactics, and some foreign criminal groups might erroneously think the state systems are linked to the NSA.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Why hackers are targeting the medical sector

A hack at Anthem, the second-largest health insurer in the country, exposed personal information about millions of employees and customers. But the attack is just the latest evidence that cybercriminals are increasingly targeting the medical sector where they can collect health information that can be sold for a premium on the black market.

“What we’ve seen in the last few years is that attackers have realized the economics of health-care data are very, very attractive,” says Lee Weiner, senior vice president at cybersecurity firm Rapid7.

Anthem said hackers collected several pieces of personal information about its employees and customers, including Social Security numbers, birthdays and street and e-mail addresses. But the hack also included medical information numbers, which can be among the most damaging types of stolen data and be used to commit medical fraud, according to security experts.

Complete health insurance credentials sold for $20 a piece on underground markets in 2013, according to Dell SecureWorks. That is 10 to 20 times more than a U.S. credit card number with a security code.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

State-sponsored Chinese hackers reportedly suspected in Anthem breach

Hackers involved in the data breach at U.S. health insurer Anthem may have ties to the Chinese government, according to a news report.

Investigators see techniques used by a nation-state attacker, with China a leading suspect, reported Bloomberg Business. The news report cited information from three people close to the investigation, being conducted by the U.S. FBI and private cybersecurity firm Mandiant.

The investigation is in its early stages, but some of the software and techniques used in the Anthem attack are similar to other attacks used almost exclusively in the past by China, according to the Bloomberg article.

The personal information, including Social Security numbers and email addresses, of about 80 million people may be exposed in the breach, according to Anthem. Anthem has 37.5 million subscribers for its health plans, and more than 68 million people are customers of its affiliated companies under brands including Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Empire Blue Cross and Amerigroup.

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Cyber Security World Conference 2015 New York City, July 10, brings together information security experts and senior executives focused on protecting today’s enterprises from internal and external cyber attacks; the list of firms just keeps growing: Adobe, ADP, Citigroup, E*Trade, Fidelity, Home Depot, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, Nasdaq, Neiman Marcus, Target and Wal-mart. Our experts will discuss strategies to strengthen corporate defenses, the cybersecurity framework, risks brought by mobile computing, lessons for the boardroom and protecting national infrastructure against foreign attacks. More information at http://cybersecurityworldconference.com.

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