Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Proposed U.S. Cyber-Security Legislation Worries Researchers

Changes proposed by the Obama Administration to a variety of laws used to prosecute cyber-crime have raised concerns among security professionals and vulnerability researchers, who worry that activities meant to improve security could lead to criminal charges.

cyber-security legislation

 

In a document published on Jan. 13, the White House presented its legislative proposals to amend a variety of laws, including the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) and the Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, to crack down on what the administration called “an unprecedented threat from rogue hackers as well as organized crime and even state actors.”

The proposed changes could make accessing public documents illegal, if the owner would not have approved; creates stricter punishments for anyone convicted of a cyber-crime; and allows the government to seize assets linked to cyber-crimes, security researchers said.

Read More

 

Advertisements
Standard
Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, IT Security, Security, Technology

Industry backing Obama’s cybersecurity agenda

Cybersecurity will be a focal point of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address Tuesday, including a proposal to standardize how private companies share and report information on cyber crime.

Many states already have legislation on the books requiring companies to report breaches in which sensitive customer information is leaked. Legislation being proposed by the administration would create a single federal statute governing how and when information on cyber attacks must be released, intended to ease confusion in the private sector.

635572643407294955-Obama

The administration is also planning to create private-sector Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations (ISAOs) to manage threat reporting and disseminate important information and offer limited liability protection to companies that participate.

“It’s very important that this legislative proposal moves forward,” said Mike Brown, vice president and general manager of global public sector for RSA. “A legislative proposal is necessary to bring clarity,” particularly to information sharing and breach notifications.

Read More

Standard
Business, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Data Breach, Defense, Finance, IT Security, Security, Technology

North Korea boosts cyber army to 6,000 troops to cause ‘physical and psychological paralysis’

North Korea has boosted its “cyber army” in a bid to cause “physical and psychological paralysis” in the South.

According to the South Korean Defence Ministry’s latest white paper, the hermit state’s military unit, which is dedicated to cyber activities, is now double that of South Korea’s.

“North Korea is currently running its 6,000 (member) workforce for cyber warfare and performing cyberattacks for physical and psychological paralysis inside South Korea such as causing troubles formilitary operations and national infrastructures,” said the South Korean Defence Ministry.

In 2013, South Korea blamed Pyongyang for the raft of crippling cyber attacks on its banks and broadcasters.

Standard
Business, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Cybersecurity, Data Breach, Defense, Finance, IT Security, Security, Technology

North Korea is doubling its skilled cyber security staffers

NORTH KOREA IS REPORTEDLYdoubling the number of its highly skilled cyber soldiers while still denying claims that it ever maliciously hacked anyone.

In case you missed it, North Korea has been accused of hacking like a dry cough. The country has had more fingers pointed at it than a button, and has got rather comfortable with denyingaccusations that it has done things like tear apart Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Now it is accused of doubling its cyber warfare posse, called Bureau 121, which the last time anyone checked was made up of some 3,000 skilled staffers.

Today, according to reports, including this one on Reuters, that number is 6,000 if South Korea is to be believed.

A white paper from the South Korean Defence Ministry said that the enlarged unit will be used to bring mischief on the South, and possibly other countries and their utilities.

Standard
Business, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Cybersecurity, Data Breach, Defense, Finance, Government, IT Security, Security, Technology

SONY HACK SIGNALS ‘NEW NORMAL’ IN CYBERSECURITY

The Sony hack copied a multinational company’s financial documents, its employees’ personally identifiable information and years’ worth ofembarrassing – and poorly written, it must be said – emails from high-level executives and released them all for the world to see.

But for many cybersecurity observers, the real eye opener was how the hack illustrates today’s cyber landscape: It’s likely to get worse before it gets better.

A growing collection of high-level computer security experts believe evidence points to aninsider-orchestrated attack, while the U.S. government quickly blamed and sanctioned North Korea, whose leader, Kim Jong-un, is portrayed in an unflattering fashion in the Sony-backed film, The Interview.

Meanwhile, as Sony’s image continues to tarnish with each leaked, scandalous revelation, the company experienced an added layer of suffering other data-breached companies — Target, Neiman Marcus and Home Depot — had avoided.

Read More

Standard
Business, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Data Breach, Defense, Finance, IT Security, Security, Technology

Air Force evolves its cybersecurity as JIE comes into focus

The Air Force is moving beyond requiring airmen to use smart identification cards to log onto its computer network. The service now is making its network security even stronger.

Lt. Gen. Bill Bender, the Air Force’s chief of information dominance and chief information officer, said the use of role-based authentication should be “baked- into” its IT systems in the future.

Read More

Standard
Business, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Data Breach, Defense, Finance, IT Security, Security, Technology

Ex-Federal Cybersecurity Director Gets 25 Years for Child Porn

A former cybersecurity chief at the Department of Health and Human Services Timothy DeFoggi was sentenced to 25 years in prison on child pornography charges Monday, according to the Department of Justice. “Using the same technological expertise he employed as Acting Director of Cyber Security at HHS, DeFoggi attempted to sexually exploit children and traffic in child pornography through an anonymous computer network of child predators,” Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell said in a statement.

A federal jury in the District of Nebraska convicted DeFoggi of child exploitation and conspiracy to distribute child pornography on Aug. 26. The 56-year-old was a member of a pornography website on the Tor network — a web browser that helps users remain anonymous online — from May 2012 until December 2012 when it was taken down by the FBI, according to the statement. He is the sixth person to be convicted in an ongoing federal investigation into three Tor-network-based child pornography websites, according to the DOJ.

Read More

Standard